“Forgotten Hollywood”- Life and Times of Elmore Leonard…

Posted on August 20, 2013 by raideoman1 | No Comments

Manny P. here…

   Elmore Leonard was a novelist and screenwriter. His earliest published novels in the 1950s were Westerns, but Leonard went on to specialize in crime fiction and suspense thrillers, many of which have been adapted into motion pictures. He was the master of his genre; the Dickens of Detroit; the Chaucer of Crime. Influenced by the glamorization of criminals, such as Bonnie  and Clyde, Leonard would later become the chief proponent of the modern crime drama.

800px-Elmore_Leonard

   ELMORE LEONARD

   Leonard had his first success in 1951 when Argosy published the short story Trail of the Apaches. When 20th Century Fox bought the rights for $10,000 in 1967, he quit the ad business to write full time. Among his many works that translated well into motion picture include 3:10 to Yuma, Hombre, Mr. Majestyk, 52 Pick-Up, and most notably, Get Shorty. Actors who excelled in interpreting his words: Glenn Ford, Van Heflin, Burt Lancaster, Charles Bronson, Paul Newman, and John Travolta.

   Every novel Elmore Leonard wrote from the mid-1980s on was a best-seller, and every fan of crime stories knew his name including George Clooney and Quentin Tarantino. Last fall, he was the first crime writer to receive an honorary National Book Award, a prize given in the past to Philip Roth, Norman Mailer and Arthur Miller. He helped achieve for crime writing what Stephen King did for horror and Ray Bradbury for science fiction… and it revived the genre, which had taken a siesta after the demise of film noir.

   Elmore Leonard was 87.

Until next time>                               “never forget”

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